Technology & Culture Update 4/27/13

fairtrade_intl_logo_custom-8e5e5ca5e4c336afa79a44820f5043b52c3b4ad0-s3In honor of Arbor Day, I’m celebrating a very special bit of greenery — the coffee tree! Yes, I have a bit of a fetish for the fruit of the bean. I’ve blogged about the application of technology to my favorite beverage here and here. For no particular reason that I can discern, NPR elected to run a special series called “Coffee Week” with a couple of segments airing each day (you can view an index to all of the programs here). It’s a very well-executed profile of coffee and coffee culture — Jerry Seinfeld even dropped in. The programs cover a wide range of topics, from the historical, social, medicinal, and sociopolitical aspects of coffee to the music emanating from the coffee-growing regions. And for more great java jams, check out Putumayo’s Music from the Coffee Lands and MCL, vol II.

Even more espresso love: These amazing panoramic views of one of my favorite java joints, Atlas Coffee in Charlottesville, Virginia, offer a great mashup of coffee culture and techno-coolness. Several views taken from different vantage points; you can scroll all around the shop! Take the virtual tour then stop by if you’re in the area. Atlas is a wonderful family business that specializes in friendly.

"Atlas Coffee" by Michael Bailey Photography

“Atlas Coffee” by Michael Bailey Photography

Neo-what? There’s no denying that language is a dynamic thing, constantly evolving. New words — neologisms — are always entering the lexicon. Some slang is (mercifully) ephemeral and passes with its generation, while jargon is often limited to a discrete community (a particular occupation, etc). Portmanteau words are all the rage (adorkable means “adorable in a dorky way”) and they can certainly help to clarify concepts, provided you understand the cultural connection, the “hip factor.” Then there are the symbols endowed with a fresh linguistic role — such as the @ (“at”) symbol, now commonly associated with twitter handles. Hence, you can follow my tweets @AdenNichols.

According to Ann Curzan, an English professor at the University of Michigan, the term “slash” is a case in point. In addition to its use as a formal noun by the guitarist Saul Hudson, slash has become the common verbal expression of a punctuation mark. The interesting thing is, it is being spelled out in written discourse. Seems counterproductive to me, but who am I to say? So as Ms Curzan explains, you may see the conjunction rendered thus: “culminating in Friday’s shootout-slash-car-chase-slash-manhunt-slash-media-circus around the apprehension of the bombing suspect.” My apologies to my British friends, to whom this is a “stroke.”

And in other linguistic news: I find NPR’s new “Code Switch” program to be very thought-provoking and entertaining (see “I’m the Café and He’s the Leche,” for example), but I must say I wasn’t blown away by the piece exploring the use of the slang term “yo” (“‘Yo’ said what?”). Researchers express their fascination with the fact that the term is used as a gender-neutral noun (in contrast, apparently, to “ho'”). That’s deep. Even more profound is the observation by Christine Mallinson, a sociolinguist at the University of Maryland, that “… even if ‘yo’ is just a fad, it says something about the kids who use it.” Yes, it says that literacy is on the wane. Rather than legitimizing this form of verbal degradation (I’m having Ebonics flashbacks), I was hoping we could just ignore it and let it die a natural death.

Turn it up to 11! As neuroscientist Oliver Sacks has ably demonstrated, music affects our brains in dramatic ways. It helps us establish our sense of self and our worldview, and contributes to our overall health and well-being. A survey article in Smithsonian offers links to eight studies providing insight into the fantastic world of musical neuroscience. My favorite is a study that defies your parents’ warnings about how “that loud music is going to permanently damage your hearing!” According to a group of Australian researchers, the hearing loss only lasts about twelve hours (YMMV). So in the immortal words of Humble Pie, Rock On!

the DW-P

Aden Nichols is an independent editor and writer. He is available for print and digital projects: books (academic, narrative/creative nonfiction, memoir, speculative/alternate history, etc.), websites/social media, and business communications. Visit his website (www.LittleFireEditorial.com) or email him at: Aden@LittleFireEditorial.com.

Humble_Pie_Rock_On


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